Growth Through Grace

STRUCTURE FOR CHRISTIAN DECISION-MAKING
DISCERNMENT

Do you have a big decision to make? Are you struggling with a lack of confidence in the decision you have made or have to make? Maybe the following guidelines can help you feel confident in your decision making.


1. Pray to God for guidance in this decision.
2. Get the FACTS.
     a. Don't let your emotions run the show.  Who, What, When, Where, How;  all the real details of the situation are important.

     b. Try to view the facts from the perspective of the other people involved to help ensure you are not skewing the facts based on your bias or fears or unrealistic expectations.
3. What are the OPTIONS?
     a. What are the possible ways of dealing with this situation/issue? Can it be done now or will it have to wait for later? 
     b. Do not exclude the possibility of doing nothing.
4. Consult with someone whose knowledge, honesty, confidentiality and judgment you trust.
5. Consult with the wisdom of the CHURCH.
      a. Are there any Church teachings, which relate to this situation/issue?
      b. Seek foundational principles, rather than less significant details.
6.  Consult SCRIPTURE.
      a. Does Scripture offer anything that would help your decision?
      b. Seek foundational principles, rather than less significant details.
7.  Use your Reason.
      a. What are the VALUES at stake in this decision?
      b. What would be the CONSEQUENCES of each of the various choices on individuals, relationships and on the larger community?
     c. What is your MOTIVE in this situation? What exactly are you trying to achieve?
      d. FUNDAMENTAL OPTION: What does this decision say about the kind of person you are becoming or about the overall direction of your life?
8. Use your IMAGINATION
      a. What advice would you give to ANOTHER person faced with the same situation?
      b. How would you feel about this choice if your decision were to become PUBLIC KNOWLEDGE?
      c. Imagine being on your DEATH BED, and ask, “What  would I then wish to have chosen?”
      d. Picture yourself standing before God on the last day, and ask, “Which decision would I then wish to have made?”
9. Give it adequate TIME. Usually if it is a good idea now it will be a good idea later.
10. Make a decision and carry it out.
      a. Not to decide is ultimately to decide.
      b. Accept Responsibility for your decision.


Making decisions can bring to surface anxiety, lack of confidence, and negative old emotional memories that are hard to deal with.  It can be helpful to seek professional guidance when you find that making decisions in some way paralyzes you. 


If you would like more information on this discernment strategy or help working through an important decision, contact me, Bernice Simmons, LPC, at 972-333-9859 or bernice@faithfulchangescounseling.com

Bernice Simmons, MS, LPC
972-333-9859
bernice@faithfulchangescounseling.com

STRUCTURE FOR CHRISTIAN DECISION-MAKING

DISCERNMENT




Do you have a big decision to make? Are you struggling with a lack of confidence in the decision you have made or have to make?  Maybe the following guidelines can help you feel confident in your decision making.

Pray to God for guidance in this decision.

Get the FACTS.

Don't let your emotions run the show.  Who, What, When, Where, How;  all the real details of the situation are important.

Try to view the facts from the perspective of the other people involved to help ensure you are not skewing the facts based on your bias or fears or unrealistic expectations.

What are the OPTIONS?

What are the possible ways of dealing with this situation/issue? Can it be done now or will it have to wait for later?

Do not exclude the possibility of doing nothing.

Consult with someone whose knowledge, honesty, confidentiality, morality, and judgment you trust.

Consult with the wisdom of the CHURCH.

Are there any Church teachings, which relate to this situation/issue?

Seek foundational principles, rather than less significant details.

Consult SCRIPTURE.

Does Scripture offer anything that would help your decision?

Seek foundational principles, rather than less significant details.

Use your Reason.

What are the VALUES at stake in this decision?

What would be the CONSEQUENCES of each of the various choices on individuals, relationships and on the larger community?

What is your MOTIVE in this situation? What exactly are you trying to achieve?

FUNDAMENTAL OPTION: What does this decision say bout the kind of person you are becoming or about the overall direction of your life?

Use your IMAGINATION

What advice would you give to ANOTHER person faced wit the same situation?

How would you feel about this choice if your decision were to become PUBLIC KNOWLEDGE?

Imagine being on your DEATH BED, and ask, “What would I then wish to have chosen?”

Picture yourself standing before God on the last day, and ask, “Which decision would I then wish to have made?”

Give it adequate TIME. Usually if it is a good idea now it will be a good idea later.

Make a decision and carry it out.

Not to decide is ultimately to decide.

Accept Responsibility for your decision.





Making decisions can bring to surface anxiety, lack of confidence, and negative old emotional memories that are hard to deal with.  It can be helpful to seek professional guidance when you find that making decisions in some way paralyzes you.  

I have created an analytical tool to aid in decision making. This tool helps quantify which decision would best support the life values that are most important to you.  I would be happy to meet with you to share this tool and decision making techniques.  You can contact me at bernice@faithfulchangescounseling.com .